William Henry Roll

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Welcome to the Roll Family Windmill – The Research Blog!

Welcome to The Roll Family Windmill!

You are free to use any of my research at the three locations, but please be sure to read the terms of the copyright at the bottom of this page.

Sylvia, Patrick, Angie

Sylvia, Patrick, Angie

Family:David Roll and Mary Lennon (1) – Genealogy

Family:David Roll and Mary Lennon (1) – Genealogy.

How many ancestors?

HOW MANY ANCESTORS DO WE HAVE????

© Lorine McGinnis Schulze

http://olivetreegenealogy.com/index.shtml

While the idea of the Diamond Theory of Ancestors is not new, I’ve taken notes from different sources, compiled my own data, and written up what I hope is an interesting and understandable explanation

If we double the number of ancestors in each generation, 2 parents, 4 grandparents, and so on, we can see that by the time we are back 10 generations, we have the potential for 1024 ancestors. But is this true? If we were to go back to the time of Charlemagne, we would find we had the potential for 281 trillion (YES!) ancestors all living at that one moment in history. This is statistically impossible! So where did our ancestors go?

It is estimated that 80% of the marriages in history were between second cousins. Why? Because the population base was smaller, people lived in small communities and migrated within those same small communities. The theory in genealogical research is that our family trees are actually shaped like a diamond, not a pyramid as shown below. Tracing back a few generations gives a wider shape. Keep going and you find the shape narrowing, eventually, the theory holds, converging to only a few ancestors.

This may sound mind-boggling but I’ve seen the truth of it. I am back a total of 14 generations which takes me to the last half of the 1500s. I’ve found that in two cases so far, I am descended from more than one child of one specific couple. Need an example? Pieter Uziele and his wife Cornelia Damen were my 8th great grandparents. I descend from two of their children: Sophia Uziele and her sister Maria Uziele. Remember, they are my 7th great-grandmothers and are in my 10th generation. I also descend from two children of Jochem Lambertse Van Valkenburg and his wife Eva Hendrickse Vrooman, who were my 8th great-grandparents. Their son Isaac and his sister Jannetie are my 7th great-grandparents and are in my 10th generation. So we see the gene pool narrowing in my 11th generation!

How? In the pyramid theory of doubling ancestors each generation, these four 7th great-grandparents would give me eight distinct individuals as ancestors for my 8th great-grandparents – but they don’t. Because they are sets of siblings, I have only four new distinct individuals as ancestors for my 8th great-grandparents – half the number I should have if the doubling theory held true. Assuming I have double sets of siblings at least three times on that 10th generation, I’ve lost six individuals from my 11th generation. That carries over to my 12th generation, but doubles the number I lose for a total of 12 ancestors. If I had three more double sets of siblings in my 11th generation, I’ve lost another six individuals in my 12th – for a total of 18 fewer individuals. Keep doing this for a few more generations and you’ll see the shape your ancestral tree is taking.

Luckily for the human race, this tendency to marry cousins reversed itself in more recent years, due to larger population bases and easier access to possible mates. Otherwise, our search for the missing link might prove to be just that !

One very interesting probability model created by a demographer for genealogists, is that a child born in 1947 in Englad tracing back to 1492 would have 60,000 ancestors. Going back further to 1215, this child would find that 80% of the entire population of England at that time would be on his/her family tree! So anyone living in present-day England who traces his/her lineage back through English history would theoretically be related. This is why genealogists find so many people searching for the same families in the 1600s and earlier, and why we find so many “cousins” out there in our search. I’ve found hundreds of cousins in the last year while searching via the Internet.

Genealogy is fascinating, and becomes even more so when we make those human contacts in present-day times with folks as far away as Norway who are descended from the same immigrant ancestor of 1624. I’ve become almost blasé about new cousins – I expect to find them, and I do!

Pyramid Theory of Doubling Ancestor

SELF
2 PARENTS
4 GRANDPARENTS
8 GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
16 GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
32 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
64 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
128 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
256 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENT
512 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
1024 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

In this theory the number of ancestors double each generation. I can’t represent the rest of the generations on this page, so following is the number of theoretical ancestors in each generation, starting at Generation 12 where the figure above leaves off.

Gen. 12: 2048
Gen. 13: 4096
Gen. 14: 8192
Gen. 15: 16384
Gen. 16: 32768

Diamond Theory of Ancestors

In this theory the pyramid begins to narrow beyond the 10th generation. I can’t represent this with numbers as they would be unknown, so I am representing the basic shape with x representing the number of individuals in each generation. I will, however make some assumptions about the number of parents and grandparents back to the 10th generation.

SELF
2 PARENTS
4 GRANDPARENTS
8 GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
16 GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
32 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
64 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
128 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
256 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENT
512 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
1024 GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
x G-G-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
x G-G-G-G-G-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
x G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
x-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

This article was researched by Lorine McGinnis Schulze of The Olive Tree Genealogy at http://olivetreegenealogy.com/index.shtml” Permission to copy is granted as long as the article remains AS IS. No changes may be made to the article and all identifying information and website link must remain intact. This Permission to Copy notice must remain with the article.

NOTE: The copyright notice above applies to this particular article. Any notice below does not apply.

The Trolley

Waiting for the trolley. Newark, NJ, Abt. 1898

This photograph, never before published, is from the collection of my grandfather William Henry Roll, 1885-1941.

We Relate – a genealogy wiki

WeRelate.org is the largest freely licensed genealogy wiki and has almost 5 million wiki pages. Supported by the Foundation for On-Line Genealogy and the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana, it provides genealogy tools and data as a free public service, on a non-commercial, nonsectarian site. Of its almost 5 million pages, WeRelate had over 2 million person pages, over 694,000 family pages and 19370 images in April 2011.

WeRelate allows users to upload GEDCOMs. The system produces a comparison screen for likely candidates, allowing users determine if subjects are the same person. Duplicate pages for common ancestors can be merged at upload.

Users are encouraged to document their research. WeRelate has over 926,000 Source pages[citation needed] which contain reference and access information along with relevant links. Source pages also provide space for review and research tips. Users may link Person and Family pages to any relevant source pages. Users may also create MySource pages for references relevant to only their research such as family bibles, birth, death and marriage certificates. Scans of documentation may be attached to any relevant page.

Place information is essential to genealogical research. WeRelate has over 900,000 referenced place pages. Where applicable, Place pages are linked to Family History Library Catalog, and Wikipedia. Where geographic coordinates are available, a google map is provided. Many pages also include timelines, population history, contained places, history, research tips and images.

Source: Wikipedia